Research institute opens at University of Hull

Research institute opens at University of Hull
Credit: Shutterstock.com/ ESB Professional

A new research centre has opened at the University of Hull with the aim of tackling some of the century’s most urgent health challenges.

From helping pregnant women and new mums with their mental health and wellbeing, to driving innovation in cancer imaging techniques, the new Institute of Clinical and Applied Health Research will advance healthcare provision in our region and beyond.

The Institute, which is based in the Allam Medical Building as part of the University’s £28 million health campus, will incorporate established University research centres such as the Academy of Primary Care and The Wolfson Palliative Care Research Centre.

The Academy is focused on providing the expertise to redesign the way GP surgeries and other primary care providers diagnose and care for patients at local, national and international level.

The Wolfson Palliative Care Research Centre, which is at the forefront of driving improvements to help those living with and dying from serious illness and reducing inequalities in care, also underpins the Institute’s solution-focused approach to research.

Professor Julie Jomeen, Dean of the Faculty of Health Sciences, said: “As a University, we are committed to making advances to healthcare that will transform the lives of patients and their families.

“From the earliest stages of life and antenatal care to managing multiple chronic illnesses and providing the best possible end-of-life care, our high-calibre research is focused on some of the most significant health challenges.

“Reducing social and health inequalities for patients in the ways they can access treatment and care is a priority.

“The Institute will also tackle poverty, obesity, smoking, alcohol and physical inactivity – the factors that affect our health as individuals, our families and the nation as a whole.”

With an ageing population, chronic diseases are reaching epidemic proportions. More people are living with multiple conditions, such as cancer, heart disease and dementia, which significantly affect their lives and reduce their life expectancy.

Under the direction of Professor Liz Walker, Academic Lead, the Institute of Clinical Applied Health Research builds on the University’s heritage of high-calibre health research and is set to make a real difference to healthcare and wellbeing.

She said: “There is no doubt, we are facing significant healthcare challenges and it is imperative that we generate the cutting-edge research which will provide the solutions to enhance quality of life and advance care for patients.

“At the Institute, we will be working collaboratively with our healthcare partners in order to bring about developments that will improve the physical, mental and social wellbeing of patients and their families.”

Seventeen scientists from around the world have been recruited to the Institute with seven more appointments to be made and ambitious plans to support a vibrant postgraduate community.