Spencer Group works on transformation of station for Govia Thameslink

Spencer

Hull-based Spencer Group is playing a key role in a project to transform services for passengers on one of the busiest stations on the rail network.

The Group is delivering a multi-million pound package of works at busy Cambridge Station for Govia Thameslink Railway, the UK’s largest train operating company, working closely with GTR and Network Rail personnel.

The works will allow faster and more frequent trains from the town through London and on to the south coast. They form part of the £7bn Thameslink Programme which is delivering substantial benefits for hundreds of thousands of commuters and other travellers on the Thameslink network.

Following site clearance works, the company now delivering new, longer sidings, with modern stabling, maintenance and train wash facilities, as part of the Cambridge Railway Sidings Capacity Upgrade Project.

The works also involve the installation of new Overhead Line Equipment (OLE) to support faster Class 700 rolling stock.

The next stage will involve the removal and replacement of a road bridge close to the station and the laying of a new track beneath one of the arches. The construction methodology has been developed to maintain pedestrian access over the bridge for a significant period during the works.

The complex works demonstrate Spencer Group’s ability to deliver challenging rail infrastructure projects while maintaining services for travellers, wherever possible.

Richard Watson, Spencer Group Project Director, said: “This has been a very challenging project but, through close collaboration with our client and the designers, we have overcome many obstacles and delivered the first phase of this scheme in line with our programme and, significantly, on schedule for the railway timetable change in May.

“This success delighted everyone involved. We’re now looking forward to the second phase of the project.”

Spencer Group has delivered large-scale, multi-disciplinary projects to improve vital parts of the UK’s rail network for more than 20 years.